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Investigating the mental health and wellbeing of young Arabic-speaking adolescents who have migrated to Ireland from conflict-affected countries

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  by Yvonne Leckey, Sinead McGilloway and Rita Sakr  Families from refugee backgrounds living in high income countries, often experience poorer psychological and wellbeing outcomes due to the many health, social and cultural challenges experienced post-migration (Fazel et al. 2012).  Over half of the world’s refugees are children aged under 18, many of whom have come from conflict-affected countries where they have experienced multiple traumas. The long-term effects of pre-migration traumas, including conflict, violence, separation and/or loss of family members, may persist without adequate supports, potentially exacerbating existing difficulties. Post-migration, refugees commonly face stigmatisation and discrimination in their host countries, contributing further to poor mental wellbeing.  In response to the refugee crisis in 2015, the Irish Government established the Irish Refugee Protection Programme (IRPP), with a commitment to accept up to 4000 refugees through the European Union

Tactics for Subverting Sextarian Citizenship in Lebanon

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  By Matthew Heinrichs In February 2020, a video circulated on social media showing a distraught Lina Jaber grieving near her daughter’s grave. Lina, a Shia woman, was barred from seeing her children for almost three years by her ex-husband before her daughter’s death, after the judge adjudicating her divorce in the Shia Jafari court granted full custody to her ex-husband. While Lina’s sister claims that the children’s father signed a decree allowing visitation, he prohibited Lina from visiting them, knowing that Lina would be unable to afford an attorney to challenge him. In January 2020, Lina’s daughter Maya was killed by a gunshot under circumstances that remain unknown, after which Lina’s ex-husband barred her and her family from attending Maya’s funeral, burying her within his fenced garden to keep Lina from even leaning on her daughter’s grave. [1] Similar stories appear regularly in Lebanese media outlets due to Lebanon’s system of personal status laws. In Lebanon, the state

Will you love me, Brother?

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  "Signs to people who reflect" by scholesyfynn  By Erika Biagini  Women are central to Islamist movements, the success of their political projects as well as their ability to survive state-led repression. In Islamist movements, women are not only those who give birth and nurture the new generations of activists, but they are also the ones who convey to them and their immediate communities the values, ideology and culture that their movements espouse. Women are also among the activists involved in the setting up and running of the large networks of Islamist social and religious associations, and are usually the first in line at polling stations in times of elections to cast their vote for Islamist candidates. Crucially, they are those who sustain Islamists in times of repression, guaranteeing their survival. Women do so by looking after the prisoners and their families, collecting funds for the movement and advocating for the prisoners’ freedom, when they are not the ones who

Rape, colonialism and the ongoing after effects of trauma

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  Adania Shibli by Ronit Lentin Review of Adania Shibli (2020) Minor Detail, London: Fitzcaraldo Editions (translated by Elisabeth Jaquette), 112 pp, £12.99 On 12 August 1949 the atmosphere at the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) outpost in Nirim in the Naqab desert near the Gaza Strip was particularly festive. It was the end of an arduous week of dusty chases in the western Naqab sand dunes after Palestinian ‘infiltrators,’ refugees attempting to get back to the homes they had been expelled from by the colonizing Zionist forces. The platoon commander, lieutenant ‘Moshe,’ told his soldiers to get the dining tent ready for a party. Tables were set with sweets and wine and at eight o’clock, he gave his soldiers a pep talk about Zionism and the important contribution they were making to the newly established State of Israel. Towards the end of the party ‘Moshe’ reminded his soldiers of the 12 year old Bedouin girl they had captured earlier that day, now locked up in one of the huts.  He gave t